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Ellen G. White and Black People Timeline

Compiled by Benjamin J. Baker



1827   

November 26: Ellen Gould Harmon is born in Gorham, Maine.

1842   

Ellen Harmon hears William Ellis Foy, a black Millerite minister, relate his visions.

1844   

William Foy hears Ellen Harmon share her vision and confirms that he was shown similiar things.

1849   

July 28: James Edson White is born.

1859   

January 25: James and Ellen White eat a meal at the home of William and Eliza Hardy, the first black Seventh-day Adventists.

Ellen G. White instructs church members to disobey the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act that requires American citizens to deliver fleeing slaves to their masters.

1861   

Ellen White receives the historic vision at Roosevelt, New York, revealing the horrible curse and degradation of slavery. She declares God is bringing judgment against America for "the high crime of slavery," and that God will punish the South for the sin of slavery and the North for so long suffering its overreaching and overbearing influence.

1878   

Ellen White preaches in an evangelistic effort in which Charles M. Kinny is baptized.

1885   

Testimonies for the Church, Vol. 1, is published.

1888   

Ellen White appeals for aid and financially helps J.R. Ruster.

1890   

Ellen White visits St. Louis and is troubled by racial tensions she witnesses there among Adventists.

1891   

March 21: Ellen White delivers the "Our Duty to the Colored People" address to church leaders.

1891-1900    Ellen White pioneers Adventist work in Australia.

1894   

Edson White and Will Palmer begin the Southern Missionary Society with the aim of educating and evangelizing African Americans in the South.

1895

The Southern Missionary Society docks the Morning Star in Vicksburg, Mississippi.

1896   

Oakwood Industrial School begins operation.

1898   

The Southern Work is published.

The Gospel Herald is published by Edson White at Yazoo City, Mississippi. It is designed to be an evangelistic journal for Black people.

1901   

April 5: Ellen White speaks to a black congregation.

1902   

Testimonies for the Church, Vol. 7, is published.

1904   

June 21: Ellen White addresses the students at Oakwood.

Ellen White speaks at Lewis C. Sheafe’s church in Washington, D.C.

1906   

August 13: Ellen White’s assistant, Dores E. Robinson, interviews her about William Foy.

1909   

April 9: Ellen White speaks to students at Oakwood.

Testimonies for the Church, Vol. 9, is published.

1912   

Ellen White signs final will and testament, which includes a stipulation for the black work in provision number 5.

1915   

July 16: Ellen White dies.